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Merge pull request #46 from randomecho/linkrot

Update progit.org links to git-scm.com book version
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Matthew McCullough 10 years ago
commit aa9f1de00c
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  2. 14
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  3. 10
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@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ layout: reference
<div class="box">
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-2.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Recording-Changes-to-the-Repository">book</a>
</span>
Basic Snapshotting
</h2>
@ -19,13 +19,13 @@ layout: reference
<p>
An important concept here is that Git has an 'index', which acts as sort
of a staging area for your snapshot. This allows you to build up a series
of well composed snapshots from changed files in your working directory,
of well composed snapshots from changed files in your working directory,
rather than having to commit all of the file changes at once.
</p>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>, you will use <code>git add</code> to start tracking new
files and also to stage changes to already tracked files, then
files and also to stage changes to already tracked files, then
<code>git status</code> and <code>git diff</code> to see what has been
modified and staged and finally <code>git commit</code> to record your
snapshot into your history. This will be the basic workflow that you use
@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-add">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-2.html#tracking_new_files">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Recording-Changes-to-the-Repository#Tracking-New-Files">book</a>
</span>
<a name="add">git add</a>
<span class="desc">adds file contents to the staging area</span>
@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ layout: reference
<div class="block">
<p>
In Git, you have to add file contents to your staging area before you
In Git, you have to add file contents to your staging area before you
can commit them. If the file is new, you can run <code>git add</code>
to initially add the file to your staging area, but even if the file
is already "tracked" - ie, it was in your last commit - you still need
@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ layout: reference
</p>
<p>Going back to our Hello World example, once we've initiated the project,
we would now start adding our files to it and we would do that with
we would now start adding our files to it and we would do that with
<code>git add</code>. We can use <code>git status</code> to see what the
state of our project is.
</p>
@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ layout: reference
<pre>
<b>$ git add README hello.rb</b>
</pre>
Now if we run <code>git status</code> again, we'll see that they've been
added.
@ -86,8 +86,8 @@ layout: reference
It is also common to recursively add all files in a new project by specifying
the current working directory like this: <code>git add .</code>. Since Git
will recursively add all files under a directory you give it, if you give it
the current working directory, it will simply start tracking every file
there. In this case, a <code>git add .</code> would have done the same
the current working directory, it will simply start tracking every file
there. In this case, a <code>git add .</code> would have done the same
thing as a <code>git add README hello.rb</code>, or for that matter so would
<code>git add *</code>, but that's only because we don't have subdirectories
which the <code>*</code> would not recurse into.
@ -111,15 +111,15 @@ layout: reference
</p>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git add</code> on a file when you want to
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git add</code> on a file when you want to
include whatever changes you've made to it in your next commit snapshot.
Anything you've changed that is not added will not be included - this means
you can craft your snapshots with a bit more precision than most other SCM
systems.</p>
<p>For a very interesting example of using this flexibility to stage only
parts of modified files at a time, see the '-p' option to
parts of modified files at a time, see the '-p' option to
<code>git add</code> in the Pro Git book.</p>
@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-status">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-2.html#checking_the_status_of_your_files">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Recording-Changes-to-the-Repository#Checking-the-Status-of-Your-Files">book</a>
</span>
<a name="status">git status</a>
<span class="desc">view the status of your files in the working directory and staging area</span>
@ -139,11 +139,11 @@ layout: reference
<div class="block">
<p>As you saw in the <code>git add</code> section, in order to see what the
status of your staging area is compared to the code in your working
status of your staging area is compared to the code in your working
directory, you can run the <code>git status</code> command. I demonstrated
using it with the <code>-s</code> option, which gives you short output.
Without that flag, the <code>git status</code> command will give you more
context and hints. Here is the same status output with and without the
context and hints. Here is the same status output with and without the
<code>-s</code>. The short output looks like this:
</p>
@ -176,11 +176,11 @@ layout: reference
</pre>
<p>You can easily see how much more compact the short output is, but the
long output has useful tips and hints as to what commands you may want to
long output has useful tips and hints as to what commands you may want to
use next.
</p>
<p>Git will also tell you about files that were deleted since your last
<p>Git will also tell you about files that were deleted since your last
commit or files that were modified or staged since your last commit.</p>
<pre>
@ -192,7 +192,7 @@ layout: reference
You can see there are two columns in the short status output. The first
column is for the staging area, the second is for the working directory.
So for example, if you have the README file staged and then you modify
it again without running <code>git add</code> a second time, you'll see
it again without running <code>git add</code> a second time, you'll see
this:
<pre>
@ -202,8 +202,8 @@ layout: reference
</pre>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git status</code> to see if anything has been modified
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git status</code> to see if anything has been modified
and/or staged since your last commit so you can decide if you want to
commit a new snapshot and what will be recorded in it.
</p>
@ -215,7 +215,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-diff">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-2.html#viewing_your_staged_and_unstaged_changes">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Recording-Changes-to-the-Repository#Viewing-Your-Staged-and-Unstaged-Changes">book</a>
</span>
<a name="diff">git diff</a>
<span class="desc">shows diff of what is staged and what is modified but unstaged</span>
@ -223,7 +223,7 @@ layout: reference
<div class="block">
<p>There are two main uses of the <code>git diff</code> command. One use we
will describe here, the other we will describe later in the
will describe here, the other we will describe later in the
<a href="/inspect">"Inspection and Comparison"</a>
section. The way we're going to use it here is to describe the
changes that are staged or modified on disk but unstaged.</p>
@ -250,16 +250,16 @@ index d62ac43..8d15d50 100644
+++ b/hello.rb</span>
<span class="lblue">@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@</span>
class HelloWorld
def self.hello
<span class="red">- puts "hello world"</span>
<span class="green">+ puts "hola mundo"</span>
end
end
</pre>
<p>So where <code>git status</code> will show you what files have changed
<p>So where <code>git status</code> will show you what files have changed
and/or been staged since your last commit, <code>git diff</code> will
show you what those changes actually are, line by line. It's generally
a good follow-up command to <code>git status</code>
@ -271,9 +271,9 @@ index d62ac43..8d15d50 100644
</h4>
<p>The <code>git diff --cached</code> command will show you what contents
have been staged. That is, this will show you the changes that will
have been staged. That is, this will show you the changes that will
currently go into the next commit snapshot. So, if you were to stage
the change to <code>hello.rb</code> in the example above,
the change to <code>hello.rb</code> in the example above,
<code>git diff</code> by itself won't show you any output because it will
only show you what is <i>not yet</i> staged.
</p>
@ -288,7 +288,7 @@ index d62ac43..8d15d50 100644
<b>$ </b>
</pre>
<p>If you want to see the staged changes, you can run
<p>If you want to see the staged changes, you can run
<code>git diff --cached</code> instead.</p>
<pre>
@ -303,12 +303,12 @@ index d62ac43..8d15d50 100644
+++ b/hello.rb</span>
<span class="lblue">@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@</span>
class HelloWorld
def self.hello
<span class="red">- puts "hello world"</span>
<span class="green">+ puts "hola mundo"</span>
end
end
</pre>
@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ index d62ac43..8d15d50 100644
<p>If you want to see both staged and unstaged changes together, you
can run <code>git diff HEAD</code> - this basically means you want to
see the difference between your working directory and the last commit,
ignoring the staging area. If we make another change to our
ignoring the staging area. If we make another change to our
<code>hello.rb</code> file then we'll have some changes staged and some
changes unstaged. Here are what all three <code>diff</code> commands
will show you:</p>
@ -333,12 +333,12 @@ index 4f40006..2ae9ba4 100644
+++ b/hello.rb</span>
<span class="lblue">@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@</span>
class HelloWorld
<span class="green">+ # says hello</span>
def self.hello
puts "hola mundo"
end
end
<b>$ git diff --cached</b>
<span class="umber">diff --git a/hello.rb b/hello.rb
@ -347,12 +347,12 @@ index 2aabb6e..4f40006 100644
+++ b/hello.rb</span>
<span class="lblue">@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@</span>
class HelloWorld
def self.hello
<span class="red">- puts "hello world"</span>
<span class="green">+ puts "hola mundo"</span>
end
end
<b>$ git diff HEAD</b>
<span class="umber">diff --git a/hello.rb b/hello.rb
@ -361,13 +361,13 @@ index 2aabb6e..2ae9ba4 100644
+++ b/hello.rb</span>
<span class="lblue">@@ -1,7 +1,8 @@</span>
class HelloWorld
<span class="green">+ # says hello</span>
def self.hello
<span class="red">- puts "hello world"</span>
<span class="green">+ puts "hola mundo"</span>
end
end
</pre>
@ -381,7 +381,7 @@ index 2aabb6e..2ae9ba4 100644
option, which will give us a summary of changes instead. Here is the
same example as above, but using the <code>--stat</code> option instead.
</p>
<pre>
<b>$ git status -s</b>
<span class="green">M</span><span class="red">M</span> hello.rb
@ -403,10 +403,10 @@ index 2aabb6e..2ae9ba4 100644
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git diff</code> to see details of the <code>git status</code>
command - <i>how</i> files have been modified or staged on a line by line
basis.
basis.
</p>
@ -417,7 +417,7 @@ index 2aabb6e..2ae9ba4 100644
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-commit">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-2.html#committing_your_changes">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Recording-Changes-to-the-Repository#Committing-Your-Changes">book</a>
</span>
<a name="commit">git commit</a>
<span class="desc">records a snapshot of the staging area</span>
@ -425,7 +425,7 @@ index 2aabb6e..2ae9ba4 100644
<div class="block">
<p>Now that you have staged the content you want to snapshot with the
<p>Now that you have staged the content you want to snapshot with the
<code>git add</code> command, you run <code>git commit</code> to actually
record the snapshot.
Git records your name and email address with every commit you make,
@ -438,7 +438,7 @@ index 2aabb6e..2ae9ba4 100644
</pre>
<p>Let's stage and commit all the changes to our
<code>hello.rb</code> file. In this first example, we'll use the
<code>hello.rb</code> file. In this first example, we'll use the
<code>-m</code> option to provide the commit message on the command line.
</p>
@ -488,10 +488,10 @@ nothing to commit (working directory clean)
the output of the <code>git status</code> command in there for you as
a reminder of what you have modified and staged.</p>
<p>In general, it's very important to write a good commit message.
<p>In general, it's very important to write a good commit message.
For open source projects, it's generally a rule to write your message
more or less in this format:</p>
<pre>
Short (50 chars or less) summary of changes
@ -531,7 +531,7 @@ Further paragraphs come after blank lines.
four commits of logically separate changes so that your work may be more
easily peer reviewed. Since there is a separation between committing and
pushing those changes, do take the time to make it easier for the people
you are working with to see what you've done by putting each logically
you are working with to see what you've done by putting each logically
separate change in a separate commit with a nice commit message so it
is easier for them to see what you are doing and why.</p>
@ -540,8 +540,8 @@ Further paragraphs come after blank lines.
<small>automatically stage all tracked, modified files before the commit</small>
</h4>
<p>If you think the <code>git add</code> stage of the workflow is too
cumbersome, Git allows you to skip that part with the <code>-a</code>
<p>If you think the <code>git add</code> stage of the workflow is too
cumbersome, Git allows you to skip that part with the <code>-a</code>
option. This basically tells Git to run <code>git add</code> on any file
that is "tracked" - that is, any file that was in your last commit and
has been modified. This allows you to do a more Subversion style workflow
@ -569,7 +569,7 @@ Further paragraphs come after blank lines.
1 files changed, 2 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-)
</pre>
<p>Notice how if you don't stage any changes and then run
<p>Notice how if you don't stage any changes and then run
<code>git commit</code>, Git will simply give you the output of the
<code>git status</code> command, reminding you that nothing is staged.
I've highlighted the important part of that message, saying that nothing
@ -584,7 +584,7 @@ Further paragraphs come after blank lines.
to actually record the snapshot forever.</p>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git commit</code> to record the snapshot of your staged
content. This snapshot can then be compared, shared and reverted to
if you need to.
@ -597,7 +597,7 @@ Further paragraphs come after blank lines.
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-reset">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-4.html#unstaging_a_staged_file">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/ch2-4.html#Unstaging-a-Staged-File">book</a>
</span>
<a name="reset">git reset HEAD</a>
<span class="desc">unstage changes that you have staged</span>
@ -605,18 +605,18 @@ Further paragraphs come after blank lines.
<div class="block">
<p><code>git reset</code> is probably the most confusing command written
by humans. I've been using Git for years, even wrote a book on it and I
still get confused by what it is going to do at times. So, I'll just
tell you the three specific invocations of it that are generally
helpful and ask you to blindly use it as I do - because it can be
by humans. I've been using Git for years, even wrote a book on it and I
still get confused by what it is going to do at times. So, I'll just
tell you the three specific invocations of it that are generally
helpful and ask you to blindly use it as I do - because it can be
very useful.
</p>
<p>In this case, we can use it to unstage something that you have
<p>In this case, we can use it to unstage something that you have
accidentally staged. Let's say that you have modified two files and want
to record them into two different commits. You should stage and commit
one, then stage and commit the other. If you accidentally stage both of
them, how do you <i>un-</i>stage one? You do it with
them, how do you <i>un-</i>stage one? You do it with
<code>git reset HEAD -- file</code>. Technically here you don't have to
add the <code>--</code> - it is used to tell Git when you have stopped
listing options and are now listing file paths, but it's probably good to
@ -659,9 +659,9 @@ M hello.rb
<p class="tip">
If you want to be able to just run <code>git unstage</code>, you can easily
setup an alias in Git. Just run
<code>git config --global alias.unstage "reset HEAD"</code>.
Once you have run that, you can then just run
setup an alias in Git. Just run
<code>git config --global alias.unstage "reset HEAD"</code>.
Once you have run that, you can then just run
<code>git unstage [file]</code> instead.
</p>
@ -683,7 +683,7 @@ M hello.rb
</pre>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git reset HEAD</code> to unstage files that you previously
ran <code>git add</code> on and wish to not include in the next commit
snapshot</p>
@ -695,7 +695,7 @@ M hello.rb
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-rm">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-2.html#removing_files">book</a>
<a href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Recording-Changes-to-the-Repository#Removing-Files">book</a>
</span>
<a name="rm-mv">git rm</a>
<span class="desc">remove files from the staging area</span>
@ -703,18 +703,18 @@ M hello.rb
<div class="block">
<p><code>git rm</code> will remove entries from the staging area.
This is a bit different from <code>git reset HEAD</code> which "unstages"
files. By "unstage" I mean it reverts the staging area to what was
there before we started modifying things. <code>git rm</code> on the
other hand just kicks the file off the stage entirely, so that it's not
<p><code>git rm</code> will remove entries from the staging area.
This is a bit different from <code>git reset HEAD</code> which "unstages"
files. By "unstage" I mean it reverts the staging area to what was
there before we started modifying things. <code>git rm</code> on the
other hand just kicks the file off the stage entirely, so that it's not
included in the next commit snapshot, thereby effectively deleting it.</p>
<p>By default, a <code>git rm file</code> will remove the file from the
<p>By default, a <code>git rm file</code> will remove the file from the
staging area entirely and also off your disk (the working directory). To
leave the file in the working directory, you can use <code>git rm --cached
</code>.</p>
<h4>
git mv
<small>git rm --cached orig; mv orig new; git add new</small>
@ -725,7 +725,7 @@ M hello.rb
Instead, it just tracks the snapshots and then figures out what files were
likely renamed by comparing snapshots. If a file was removed from one
snapshot and another file was added to the next one and the contents are
similar, Git figures it was most likely a rename. So, although the
similar, Git figures it was most likely a rename. So, although the
<code>git mv</code> command exists, it is superfluous - all it does is a
<code>git rm --cached</code>, moves the file on disk, then runs a
<code>git add</code> on the new file. You don't really need to use it, but
@ -739,8 +739,8 @@ M hello.rb
from your index, too.</p>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git rm</code> to remove files from being tracked in Git. It
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git rm</code> to remove files from being tracked in Git. It
will also remove them from your working directory.</p>
</p>

@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ layout: reference
<div class="box">
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch3-0.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching">book</a>
</span>
Branching and Merging
</h2>
@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-branch">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch3-2.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching-What-a-Branch-Is">book</a>
</span>
<a name="branch">git branch</a>
<span class="desc">list, create and manage working contexts</span>
@ -50,7 +50,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-checkout">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch3-2.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching-Basic-Branching-and-Merging">book</a>
</span>
<a name="checkout">git checkout</a>
<span class="desc">switch to a new branch context</span>
@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ layout: reference
<p>Without arguments, <code>git branch</code> will list out the local
branches that you have. The branch that you are currently working on will
have a star next to it and if you have
<a href="http://progit.org/book/ch7-1.html#colors_in_git">coloring turned on</a>,
<a href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Customizing-Git-Git-Configuration#Colors-in-Git">coloring turned on</a>,
will show the current branch in green.
</p>
@ -227,7 +227,7 @@ Deleted branch testing (was 78b2670).
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-merge">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch3-2.html#basic_merging">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching-Basic-Branching-and-Merging#Basic-Merging">book</a>
</span>
<a name="merge">git merge</a>
<span class="desc">merge a branch context into your current one</span>
@ -473,7 +473,7 @@ M README
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-log">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch6-1.html#commit_ranges">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Tools-Revision-Selection#Commit-Ranges">book</a>
</span>
<a name="log">git log</a>
<span class="desc">show commit history of a branch</span>
@ -696,7 +696,7 @@ ab5ab4c added erlang
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-tag">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-6.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Tagging">book</a>
</span>
<a name="tag">git tag</a>
<span class="desc">tag a point in history as important</span>

@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-init">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-1.html#initializing_a_repository_in_an_existing_directory">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Getting-a-Git-Repository#Initializing-a-Repository-in-an-Existing-Directory">book</a>
</span>
<a name="init">git init</a>
<span class="desc">initializes a directory as a Git repository</span>
@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ Initialized empty Git repository in /opt/konichiwa/.git/
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-clone">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-1.html#cloning_an_existing_repository">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Getting-a-Git-Repository#Cloning-an-Existing-Repository">book</a>
</span>
<a name="clone">git clone</a>
<span class="desc">copy a git repository so you can add to it</span>
@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ Initialized empty Git repository in /opt/konichiwa/.git/
<p>
If you need to collaborate with someone on a project, or if you want to
get a copy of a project so you can look at or use the code, you will
clone it. You simply run the <code>git clone [url]</code> command with
clone it. You simply run the <code>git clone [url]</code> command with
the URL of the project you want to copy.
</p>
@ -120,14 +120,14 @@ config index <span class="blue">objects</span>
</pre>
<p>
By default, Git will create a directory that is the same name as the
By default, Git will create a directory that is the same name as the
project in the URL you give it - basically whatever is after the last slash
of the URL. If you want something different, you can just put it at the
end of the command, after the URL.
</p>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>, you use <code>git clone</code> to get a
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>, you use <code>git clone</code> to get a
local copy of a Git repository so you can look at it or start modifying
it.</p>

@ -16,9 +16,9 @@ layout: reference
Each section will link to the next section, so it can be used
as a tutorial. Every page will also link to more in-depth
Git documentation such as the official manual pages and relevant
sections in the <a href="http://progit.org">Pro Git book</a>,
so you can learn more about any of
the commands. First, we'll start with thinking about source code
sections in the <a href="http://git-scm.com/book">Pro Git book</a>,
so you can learn more about any of
the commands. First, we'll start with thinking about source code
management like Git does.
</p>
</div>
@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ layout: reference
<div class="block">
<p>
The first thing that is important to understand about Git is
that it thinks about version control very differently than
that it thinks about version control very differently than
Subversion or Perforce or whatever SCM you may be used to. It
is often easier to learn Git by trying to forget your assumptions
about how version control works and try to think about it in the
@ -37,16 +37,16 @@ layout: reference
</p>
<p>
Let's start from scratch. Assume you are designing a new source
Let's start from scratch. Assume you are designing a new source
code management system. How did you do basic version control before
you used a tool for it? Chances are that you simply copied your
you used a tool for it? Chances are that you simply copied your
project directory to save what it looked like at that point.
</p>
<pre> $ cp -R project project.bak </pre>
<p>
That way, you can easily revert files that get messed up later, or
That way, you can easily revert files that get messed up later, or
see what you have changed by comparing what the project looks like
now to what it looked like when you copied it.
</p>
@ -59,8 +59,8 @@ layout: reference
<pre> $ cp -R project project.2010-06-01.bak </pre>
<p>
In that case, you may have a bunch of snapshots of your project that
you can compare and inspect from. You can even use this model to
In that case, you may have a bunch of snapshots of your project that
you can compare and inspect from. You can even use this model to
fairly effectively share changes with someone. If you zip up your
project at a known state and put it on your website, other developers
can download that, change it and send you a patch pretty easily.
@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ layout: reference
<p>
Now the original developer can apply that patch to their copy of the
project and they have your changes. This is how many open source
project and they have your changes. This is how many open source
projects have been collaborated on for several years.
</p>
@ -91,10 +91,10 @@ layout: reference
<p>
This is essentially what Git is. You tell Git you want to save a snapshot
of your project with the <code>git commit</code> command and it basically
records a manifest of what all of the files in your project look like at
of your project with the <code>git commit</code> command and it basically
records a manifest of what all of the files in your project look like at
that point. Then most of the commands work with those manifests to see
how they differ or pull content out of them, etc.
how they differ or pull content out of them, etc.
</p>
<center><img src="./images/snapshots.png"/></center>
@ -102,7 +102,7 @@ layout: reference
<p>
If you think about Git
as a tool for storing and comparing and merging snapshots of your project,
it may be easier to understand what is going on and how to do things
it may be easier to understand what is going on and how to do things
properly.
</p>

@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ layout: reference
<div class="box">
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-3.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Viewing-the-Commit-History">book</a>
</span>
Inspection and Comparison
</h2>
@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-log">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-3.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Viewing-the-Commit-History#Limiting-Log-Output">book</a>
</span>
<a name="log">git log</a>
<span class="desc">filter your commit history</span>
@ -310,7 +310,7 @@ Date: Fri Jun 4 12:58:53 2010 +0200
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-diff">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch5-3.html#determining_what_is_introduced">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Distributed-Git-Maintaining-a-Project#Determining-What-Is-Introduced">book</a>
</span>
<a name="diff">git diff</a>
<span class="desc"></span>
@ -471,4 +471,4 @@ index bb86f00..192151c 100644
</div>
<p>And that's it! For more information, try reading the
<a href="http://progit.org">Pro Git book</a>.</p>
<a href="http://git-scm.com/book/">Pro Git book</a>.</p>

@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ layout: reference
<div class="box">
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-5.html">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Working-with-Remotes">book</a>
</span>
Sharing and Updating Projects
</h2>
@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ layout: reference
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-remote">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-5.html#showing_your_remotes">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Working-with-Remotes#Showing-Your-Remotes">book</a>
</span>
<a name="remote">git remote</a>
<span class="desc">list, add and delete remote repository aliases</span>
@ -160,7 +160,7 @@ github git@github.com:schacon/hw.git (push)
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-fetch">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-5.html#fetching_and_pulling_from_your_remotes">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Working-with-Remotes#Fetching-and-Pulling-from-Your-Remotes">book</a>
</span>
<a name="fetch">git fetch</a>
<span class="desc">download new branches and data from a remote repository</span>
@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ github git@github.com:schacon/hw.git (push)
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-pull">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Working-with-Remotes#Fetching-and-Pulling-from-Your-Remotes">book</a>
</span>
<a name="pull">git pull</a>
<span class="desc">fetch from a remote repo and try to merge into the current branch</span>
@ -255,7 +255,7 @@ From github.com:schacon/hw
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/docs/git-push">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a target="new" href="http://progit.org/book/ch2-5.html#pushing_to_your_remotes">book</a>
<a target="new" href="http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Basics-Working-with-Remotes#Pushing-to-Your-Remotes">book</a>
</span>
<a name="push">git push</a>
<span class="desc">push your new branches and data to a remote repository</span>

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