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add and status basically done

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Scott Chacon 12 years ago
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8ea8f0ccc7
  1. 6
      NOTES
  2. 6
      _layouts/reference.html
  3. 190
      basic/index.html
  4. 12
      cookbook.html
  5. 18
      css/layout.css
  6. 9
      index.html

6
NOTES

@ -31,3 +31,9 @@ Fixing History
* rebase
* revert
<div class="note">
<h3>My Note</h3>
this note is pretty cool.
this note is pretty cool.
</div>

6
_layouts/reference.html

@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Git Quick Reference</title>
<title>Git Reference</title>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/css/reset.css" media="screen" />
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/css/text.css" media="screen" />
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/css/grid.css" media="screen" />
@ -18,13 +18,13 @@
<div class="container_12">
<div class="grid_12">
<span id="branding">Git Quick Reference</span>
<span id="branding">Git Reference</span>
</div>
<div class="grid_12">
<ul id="menu">
<li><a id="menu_home" href="/index.html">Reference</a></li>
<li><a id="menu_recepies" href="#">Recipies</a></li>
<!-- <li><a id="menu_cookbook" href="/cookbook.html">Cookbook</a></li> -->
<li><a id="menu_about" href="/about.html">About</a></li>
<li>&#167;</li>
<li><a href="http://github.com/schacon/git-reference">Site Source</a></li>

190
basic/index.html

@ -6,10 +6,196 @@ layout: reference
<h2>Basic Snapshotting</h2>
<div class="block">
<p>
something
Git is all about composing and saving snapshots of your project and then
working with and comparing those snapshots. This section will explain
the commands needed to compose and commit snapshots of your project.
</p>
<p>
An important concept here is that Git has an 'index', which acts as sort
of a staging area for your snapshot. This allows you to build up a series
of well composed snapshots from changed files in your working directory,
rather than having to commit all of the file changes at once.
</p>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>, you will use <code>git add</code> to start tracking new
files and also to stage changes to already tracked files, then
<code>git status</code> and <code>git diff</code> to see what has been
modified and staged and finally <code>git commit</code> to record your
snapshot into your history. This will be the basic workflow that you use
most of the time.
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div class="box">
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a href="#">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a href="#">book</a>
</span>
<a name="add">git add</a>
<span class="desc">adds file contents to the staging area</span>
</h2>
<div class="block">
<p>
In Git, you have to add file contents to your staging area before you
can commit them. If the file is new, you can run <code>git add</code>
to initially add the file to your staging area, but even if the file
is already "tracked" - ie, it was in your last commit - you still need
to call <code>git add</code> to add new modifications to your staging
area. Let's see a few examples of this.
</p>
<p>Going back to our Hello World example, once we've initiated the project,
we would now start adding our files to it and we would do that with
<code>git add</code>. We can use <code>git status</code> to see what the
state of our project is.
</p>
<pre>
$ git status -s
?? README
?? hello.rb
</pre>
So right now we have two untracked files. We can now add them.
<pre>
$ git add README hello.rb
</pre>
Now if we run <code>git status</code> again, we'll see that they've been
added.
<pre>
$ git status -s
A README
A hello.rb
</pre>
<p>OK, so now if we edit one of these files and run <code>git status</code>
again, we will see something odd.</p>
<pre>
$ vim README
$ git status -s
AM README
A hello.rb
</pre>
<p>The 'AM' status means that the file has been modified on disk since we
last added it. This means that if we commit our snapshot right now, we will
be recording the version of the file when we last ran <code>git add</code>,
not the version that is on our disk. Git does not assume that what the file
looks like on disk is neccesarily what you want to snapshot - you have to
tell Git with the <code>git add</code> command.
</p>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git add</code> on a file when you want to
include whatever changes you've made to it in your next commit snapshot.
Anything you've changed that is not added will not be included - this means
you can craft your snapshots with a bit more precision than most other SCM
systems.</p>
<p>For a very interesting example of using this flexibility to stage only
parts of modified files at a time, see the '-p' option to
<code>git add</code> in the Pro Git book.</p>
</div>
</div>
<div class="box">
<h2>
<span class="docs">
<a href="#">docs</a> &nbsp;
<a href="#">book</a>
</span>
<a name="status">git status</a>
<span class="desc">view the status of your files in the working directory and staging area</span>
</h2>
<div class="block">
<p>As you saw in the <code>git add</code> section, in order to see what the
status of your staging area is compared to the code in your working
directory, you can run the <code>git status</code> command. I demonstrated
using it with the <code>-s</code> option, which gives you short output.
Without that flag, the <code>git status</code> command will give you more
context and hints. Here is the same status output with and without the
<code>-s</code>. The short output looks like this:
</p>
<pre>
<b>$ git status -s</b>
<span class="green">A</span><span class="red">M</span> README
<span class="green">A</span> hello.rb
</pre>
Where the same status with the long output looks like this:
<pre>
<b>$ git status</b>
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Changes to be committed:
# (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage)
#
# <span class="green">new file: README</span>
# <span class="green">new file: hello.rb</span>
#
# Changed but not updated:
# (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
# (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
# <span class="red">modified: README</span>
#
</pre>
<p>You can easily see how much more compact the short output is, but the
long output has useful tips and hints as to what commands you may want to
use next.
</p>
<p>Git will also tell you about files that were deleted since your last
commit or files that were modified or staged since your last commit.</p>
<pre>
<b>$ git status -s</b>
<span class="green">M</span> README
<span class="red">D</span> hello.rb
</pre>
You can see there are two columns in the short status output. The first
column is for the staging area, the second is for the working directory.
So for example, if you have the README file staged and then you modify
it again without running <code>git add</code> a second time, you'll see
this:
<pre>
<b>$ git status -s</b>
<span class="green">M</span><span class="red">M</span> README
<span class="red">D</span> hello.rb
</pre>
<p class="nutshell">
<strong>In a nutshell</strong>,
you run <code>git status</code> to see if anything has been modified
and/or staged since your last commit so you can decide if you want to
commit a new snapshot and what will be recorded in it.
</p>
</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><a href="/basic">On to Adding Content &#187;</a></p>
<p><a href="/basic">On to Branching and Merging &#187;</a></p>

12
cookbook.html

@ -0,0 +1,12 @@
---
layout: reference
---
<div class="box">
<h2>Git Cookbook</h2>
<ul>
<li>Revert a file</li>
<li>Recover a lost branch</li>
<li>Contribute to a project on GitHub</li>
<li>Undo a merge</li>
</ul>
</div>

18
css/layout.css

@ -31,12 +31,30 @@ body {
code { background: #ffe; padding: 2px 5px; }
p.nutshell {
background: #ddd;
padding: 5px;
}
.box pre {
margin-top: 10px;
padding: 8px;
background: #ffe;
}
.box code.code {
white-space:pre;
font-family:monospace;
padding: 8px;
background: #ffe;
display: block;
margin: 10px;
color: #555;
}
code.code b { color: #111; }
.red { color: #833; }
.green { color: #383; }
.note {
float: right;
border: 10px;

9
index.html

@ -14,10 +14,11 @@ layout: reference
</p>
<p>
Each section will link to the next section, so it can be used
as a tutorial. Every page will also link to the more in-depth
offical Git documentation to learn more about any of the commands.
First, we'll start with thinking about source code management like
Git does.
as a tutorial. Every page will also link to more in-depth
Git documentation such as the offical manual pages and relevant
sections in the Pro Git book, so you can learn more about any of
the commands. First, we'll start with thinking about source code
management like Git does.
</p>
</div>
</div>

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